Introducing HTML5 and HTML5 for Web Designers, a review

I wasn’t really HTML5′s biggest fan. The fact that you can write it however you want made me very worried that it might result in poor coding again (unclosed tags, or mismatched closing tags). But after reading Introducing HTML5 and HTML5 for Web Designers, I realized that what it lacked in rigid coding conventions it made up with semantic elements like section, article, nav, aside, header and footer to name a few.

If you’re planning on learning more about HTML5 then I suggest that you pick up these two books as it will help you immensely. Funny enough, while I’m reading these books, I suddenly realized how bad I did in coding this site up. I’m currently in the process of re-writing the entire thing while keeping in mind the mobile first philosophy. It’s a little challenging, but that’s how things get more fun, right? (I sure miss IE a little bit.)

Introducing HTML5 by Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp

Introducing HTML5 book cover Bought Introducing HTML5 (ref) a couple of days after I got my Kindle. The sample file was engaging and I thought it would be great to read about HTML5 in one place. The web is just buzzing with HTML5 news and tips and tricks that just getting up to date is hard to do.

The book uses a conversational tone and it’s probably the biggest reason why I love it. Bruce Lawson and Remy Sharp were able to discuss the difference between seemingly similar elements in a very clear and concise way. The explanations are so easy to understand that I just realized that, unfortunately, the only thing I did right in my markup (in this site) is using article for my blog posts.

The book is divided into 10 chapters, they discussed how HTML started to structuring text elements and new types of forms, to using video and audio tags properly as well as canvas, how to access and set data storages, offline mode, drag and drop, geolocation and APIs.

Pros

I love how in-depth the book is, it gave a lot of examples that you can follow throughout the book, the discussions on which element is which and what for is so succinct. Introduction to HTML5 is a very meaty one, it’s the type of book you’re going to consult over and over again.

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